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Vitamin A

By WLR Staff, by John Litchfield

Due to findings by the Expert Group on Vitamins and Minerals (EVM) in 2003 on the risks of having a high vitamin A intake, the Food Standards Agency (FSA) has requested further research.

The FSA asked the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) to look into evidence that high intakes of vitamin A can increase the risk of osteoporosis in later life.

They have concluded that people who eat liver, a rich source of vitamin A, or liver products more than once a week should not increase this amount or take vitamin A supplements.

Women who have been through the menopause or men over 65, who are at a higher risk of developing osteoporosis, should avoid eating more than 1.5mg of vitamin A per day and pregnant women should avoid liver, liver products and vitamin A supplements as excessive quantities can be harmful to an unborn baby.

It should be noted that for the majority of people eating liver more than once per week there is no cause for panic as concerns are over regular consumption over many years.

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